CPUT Dean Of Students



CPUT Dean Of Students

CPUT Dean Of Students, CPUT Dean of Students Cora Njoli Motale was recently selected to participate in this year’s American Council on Education (ACE) Fellowship Programme.
The programme provides higher education professionals with high-level leadership training as well as mentorship by a senior executive at an international University.
The appointment places Motale within an influential network of higher education executives. Since its inception in 1965, the ACE Fellowship Program has refined the leadership and management skills of over 1 500 Fellows and provided a forum where representatives of different institutions can learn about each other’s culture, policies and decision-making processes.
The 2009 Fellowship class list features 42 individuals, three of whom are South African. Joining the CPUT Dean of Students on the programme will be Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University Senior Director of Human Resources Gary Paul and Stellenbosch University Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) Arnold van Zyl.
South Africa ’s involvement with the Fellowship is supported by the Higher Education Leadership and Management (HELM) programme of Higher Education South Africa (HESA). Since 2003, HESA has invited the Vice-Chancellors of its member universities to submit the names of staff members suitable for the Fellowship.
According to HELM Program Administrator Esther Roman, each local application must be supported by motivational documentation from the applicant as well as letters of recommendation from senior staff members.
Motale is grateful for the support she has received in her application – not only from members of CPUT’s Executive Management but also from a “wide spectrum of people” from across the institution.
As preparation for the programme, she will undergo an independent assessment of her leadership skills, administered by Lominger International. Thereafter, she will submit assignments to ACE every two weeks and keep in constant contact with other members of the Fellowship via a forum on ACE’s Blackboard e-learning site.
An important task at this stage of the programme is selecting an institution where the Dean of Students will undergo a period of mentorship. ACE Fellows are required to list their own learning needs, review various international institutions and determine which one matches those needs.
For Motale, her preferred host institution would be, “fairly young and under construction – an institution within its first ten years, as that’s where we are.”
Such an environment would give the Dean of Students the opportunity to investigate how another university has constructed its identity, rolled out its vision and taken advantage or modern technologies.
Motale is also interested in mentorship at institutions with “strong linkages to community, industry and research” as well as institutions that, like CPUT, are involved in quality assessment.
She would prefer to spend time at a university that operates in an urban area in order to see how it deals with transport and student affairs challenges, which are similar to those CPUT faces.
Motale looks forward to the program as a period of personal and professional growth.
“I am hoping to understand where I am as a leader,” she said. “I will learn how people view leadership.”
She views the ACE Fellowship as a means to not only develop her own skills, but also to create new opportunities for staff members through CPUT’s entry into the ACE Fellowship network.
“At CPUT we often say we are creating futures. I hope I will help create futures for fellow CPUT staff and students, especially women,” said Motale.
She hopes that she will be the first of many CPUT representatives, from all backgrounds, to become ACE Fellows.